Band / Reviews / Check Out Gigs


“Tracks like ‘Palladium’ and ‘A Lightbulb Turning Off’ are instant classics for this wave of indie, easily superior to anything created by Franz Ferdinand, Kasabian, Kaiser Chiefs, The Killers, Razorlight, Kooks, The View, The Fratellis, Bloc Party and Keane in the last couple of years.”
After a set that left drunken birthday girls happy but everyone else crumpled into the foetal position begging for the pain to go away, on came the headliners. The Outside Royalty have been on a Club COG stage three times, which is a good indication as to what kind of band they are. Tonight, they played the role of saviours, and they played it with aplomb.

Intelligent indie with cello and violin that’s actually integral to the music instead of being used as a gimmicky afterthought is rare enough. But when you add to this songs with quality, drive and substance, carried off by a band with spirit and charm, you have a unique combination. I say unique, because other bands like Tigers That Talked may contain many similar qualities, but none possess the hook-laden hit collection of The Outside Royalty.

Tracks like ‘Palladium’ and ‘A Lightbulb Turning Off’ are instant classics for this wave of indie, easily superior to anything created by Franz Ferdinand, Kasabian, Kaiser Chiefs, The Killers, Razorlight, Kooks, The View, The Fratellis, Bloc Party and Keane in the last couple of years. The reason, apart from obviously having more artistic integrity than most of the aforementioned acts, is the gravitas of their songs. The vocal delivery is passionate and meaningful. The drums are not heard, but felt. The bass kicks and provokes. The guitar and classical string instruments dance to the foreground, with the keyboard anchoring songs like ‘Safety in Numbers’ majestically.

There’s a feeling that The Outside Royalty just know what a good song is, and as they ended their set to cheers, there was an individual cry of disappointment by a moustachioed freakboy (who is in no way an acquaintance of mine) that the quite magical ‘Voice Beneath the Rubble’ hadn’t been performed, due to the cellist being overseas. After some animated begging by the mentalist (seriously, never seen him before in my life) and a check that time would be allowed, the band played it anyway, much to the crowd’s delight. Even with a key instrument missing, ‘Voice Beneath the Rubble’, perhaps their most beautiful and invasive piece, is a memorable experience, and one that comes highly recommended to anyone who likes indie without fitting into jeans meant for 14 year old girls.

All’s well that ends well, and the night ended very well indeed. Their set even had the cap-wearing miscreant satisfied (I promise he’ll never come again). I’m off to see if my uncle would beat up my granddad if I promise to give him his insulin back. Hopefully Diabetes Death Fights III would be the one to catapult me to directorial stardom, I’m running out of elderly family. Hollywood, here I come. Until next time,



Subscribe to Email List: